Who We Will Have Been | Hot Docs

Who We Will Have Been Tops Hot Docs Audience Award Update

May 5 update for audience rankings

2 mins read

The Canadian reign is over! An international title takes the lead for the first time during this year’s festival with today’s update in the Hot Docs Audience Award rankings. The German doc Who We Will Have Been, directed by Erec Brehmer and his late partner Angelina Zeidler, jumped from fifth to first as more ballots flowed in. Who We Will Have Been is a personal study of the filmmakers’ relationship and an exploration of grief and absence as Brehmer revisits photographs and videos to evoke Zeidler’s presence. Queer music doc Sirens, about the Lebanese music scene, sits in the runner-up spot.

Yesterday’s leader, Jason Loftus’s Eternal Spring, dropped to third place overall but continues to hold the lead in the race for the Rogers Audience Award for Canadian films. Moving up to fourth, and second in the Rogers race, is Barri Cohen’s Unloved. Okay! (The ASD Band Film) advances to fifth overall and into third for the Rogers prize. The political animals doc Hunting in Packs by Chloe Sosa-Sims trails in fourth for the Rogers Audience Award (sixth place overall) and former leader Beautiful Scars by Shane Belcourt sits in fifth (eighth overall). The top three Rogers Audience Award winners receive $25,000, $15,000, and $10,000, respectively, according to their final placement.

 

The Hot Docs Audience Award rankings for May 5 are:

 

  1. Who We Will Have Been
  2. Sirens
  3. Eternal Spring  
  4. Unloved: Huronia’s Forgotten Children
  5. Okay! (The ASD Band Film)
  6. Hunting in Packs
  7. Alis
  8. Beautiful Scars  
  9. Relative
  10. Navalny
  11. Sam Now
  12. Category: Woman
  13. Smell of Money
  14. The Unsolved Murder of Beverly Lynn Smith
  15. How Saba Kept Singing
  16. Batata  
  17. Quiet Epidemic
  18. Shelter  
  19. The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks
  20. Dad Can Dance

Pat Mullen is the publisher of POV Magazine. He holds a Master’s in Film Studies from Carleton University where his research focused on adaptation and Canadian cinema. Pat has also contributed to outlets including The Canadian Encyclopedia, Paste, That Shelf, Sharp, and Complex. He is the vice president of the Toronto Film Critics Association.

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